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machining

Results 1 - 13 of 13Sort Results By: Published Date | Title | Company Name
Published By: OPTIS     Published Date: Sep 22, 2015
This white paper provides manufacturers with an outline of the latest developments in lean machining and how they are helping to achieve the ideal of Lights Out machining.
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OPTIS
Published By: 3D Systems     Published Date: Aug 29, 2019
As a mold maker, you have probably experienced challenges with your current software including working with multiple solutions, inefficient mold design capabilities, poor technical support and many more. By switching to an integrated CAD/CAM software that’s dedicated for mold design and manufacturing, you can reduce delivery times, improve tool quality and gain a competitive advantage. Download this whitepaper to learn more about why you need an integrated solution, as well as the key elements to look for in a CAD/CAM solution.
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cad cam, cad/cam, cad/cam software, cad software, cam software, mold, mold design, mold design software
    
3D Systems
Published By: Makino     Published Date: Jun 23, 2017
With rising demands for shorter lead-times, faster throughput, improved quality and lower costs, automated manufacturing systems have become essential to the success of U.S. manufacturing. Their benefits stretch across numerous industries and production methods; however, their complexity can oftentimes be intimidating to first-time investors. Within this white paper, manufacturers can uncover the information necessary to properly plan and specify the integration of a new automated manufacturing system.
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automation, automated manufacturing, automated machining, automation systems, flexible manufacturing systems, machine tool automation
    
Makino
Published By: Makino     Published Date: Jun 23, 2017
Leadership at Chicago Faucets of Milwaukee, Wis., discusses how investments in flexible manufacturing systems helped drive company-wide supply chain improvements for improved delivery, inventory management and profitability in the manufacturing of its commercial faucets. Using two MMC2 flexible manufacturing cells with Makino horizontal machining centers, the company’s manufacturing team achieved the flexibility necessary to efficiently respond to real-time customer demand within an exceptionally high-mix production environment.
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flexible manufacturing system, fms, machining automation, automated machining, machine tool automation, automated pallet handling, automated material handling
    
Makino
Published By: Makino     Published Date: Jun 23, 2017
Aaron Woller, president of Woller Precision Machine, discusses how his company enhanced its productivity and profitability by transitioning from conventional vertical machining centers to an automated horizontal machining cell. Beyond simply improving capacity and workflow, this investment in automation has enabled Woller to maximize the value of skilled labor, redeploying personnel into new business development roles. In doing so, the company experienced a 21 percent increase in sales with only a 6 percent increase in labor requirements.
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horizontal machining centers, horizontal milling machines, pallet handling system, hmc, pallet transfer system, automation, automated machining
    
Makino
Published By: Autodesk     Published Date: May 22, 2017
The future of making things is here, and it is complex. Engineering leaders are under constant and growing pressure to find more innovative solutions for increasingly demanding customers in the context of an extremely competitive global market.
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additive manufacturing, generative design, simulation, high-speed manufacturing, smart manufacturing, enhanced customization, innovation, rapid prototyping
    
Autodesk
Published By: Autodesk     Published Date: May 22, 2017
Industrial applications of additive manufacturing are expanding across many industries, driven by rapidly improving capabilities and economics
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additive manufacturing, generative design, simulation, high-speed manufacturing, smart manufacturing, enhanced customization, innovation, rapid prototyping
    
Autodesk
Published By: Stratasys EMEA     Published Date: Feb 21, 2019
Ask anyone in business, higher education or the medical community what their top objectives are and they’ll probably say it’s to achieve more, to solve more problems, faster than what’s possible now, while saving money in the process. Ask what’s holding them back and you’ll probably find a diverse variety of obstacles in their day-to-day work processes that hinder them in meeting those goals. Having the right tools to do the job is one crucial element in solving problems and becoming more efficient and productive. Additive manufacturing, widely known as 3D printing, is one of those tools that has helped businesses, educators, health care providers and researchers improve how they design, manufacture and perform research. While no tool is an all-in-one solution, 3D printing is a strong step in that direction, particularly in its most sophisticated forms. 3D printing makes it possible to manufacture things that aren’t feasible with traditional processes like machining or injection moldi
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Stratasys EMEA
Published By: Stratasys EMEA     Published Date: Feb 21, 2019
Factory production lines know the right jig or fixture speeds production, which increases productivity. But that’s just the beginning. Well-designed tools are more ergonomic, offering both increased worker safety and productivity, as well as cost savings. Traditional machining produces heavy, costly, multi-piece tools that become an even greater liability as repetitive motion injuries erode line productivity with worker disability. Redesign means even more protracted timelines for machined parts. While essential to efficiency, accuracy and safety, jigs and fixtures are often considered a necessary evil in the overall production process. Costly, protracted timelines for machined jigs and fixtures are the culprit here, especially for the often complex designs necessary to meet unique part needs. This, along with certain complex designs that simply cannot be manufactured using traditional methods are a reality on the production floor. But there is a better way. 3D printed jigs and fixture
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Stratasys EMEA
Published By: ASME - Protolabs     Published Date: Aug 28, 2019
Over the past three decades, 3D printing has developed a reputation as an essential manufacturing process for prototype parts. Create a CAD model of your design, send it to your company’s printer, and a 3D replica will be ready in hours. Yet these parts are often little more than conceptual show-and-tell models, not durable enough for long-term use, and in some cases prone to degradation by sunlight. The winds of manufacturing are beginning to shift, however, and industrial-grade 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, is now encroaching on machining, injection molding, and other conventional manufacturing processes. This white paper explores the new and existing technology leaders in this area, and assesses the capabilities of production for each 3D printing process. Download your copy today!
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ASME - Protolabs
Published By: ASME     Published Date: Oct 03, 2019
Considering metal 3D printing for your next project? Our comprehensive guide covers everything you need to know to build quality, production-grade parts, including how to select the right material, design for the technology, and enhance parts with post-processes like machining and heat treatment. Download your copy today!
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ASME
Published By: RedEye On Demand     Published Date: Apr 09, 2009
Direct digital manufacturing, otherwise known as rapid manufacturing, is a process that employs additive fabrication technology (aka rapid prototyping) to produce end-use items. Directly from CAD data, components are manufactured without molding, casting or machining. The impact of direct digital manufacturing is far-reaching, and the opportunities and advantages are extensive. This is why direct digital manufacturing is heralded as the next industrial revolution.
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redeye on demand, cad, rapid manufacturing, jigs & fixtures, design for manufacturability, design for assembly, return on investment
    
RedEye On Demand
Published By: Dassault Systèmes     Published Date: Jun 19, 2018
As more companies compete for business, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) increasingly demand higher production rates and greater production flexibility from suppliers. If smaller-sized companies want to compete, they need the right tools and latest technology. NC Machining manufactures should ask three primary questions when considering the tools to improve competitiveness and implement Lean practices: • Do the tools provide the means for improved collaboration between engineering and manufacturing, and incorporate manufacturing best practices? • Can all data and program information reside in one database or platform that is accessible concurrently by all enterprise stakeholders—from design engineering to the shop floor? • Is it possible to perform real-time multi-disciplinary simulations to improve performance and manufacturing targets? Discover how to optimize your NC Machine Shop Production, minim
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Dassault Systèmes
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